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Sea Urchin

Must Try

Matilda Cruz
Matilda double majored in zoology and animal behavior at the University of Hawaii. She’s been an animal lover from a young age and knew she wanted to study them even more for her career. She’s always looking for ways to spread her animal knowledge.

Sea urchins are the most interesting animals found on the bottom of the ocean floor. You may have seen what these little guys look like when scuba diving or at an aquarium with your family. For those of you that haven’t seen them, they look like little porcupines because they have a common interest. Sea urchins are spiky as well. Here are some interesting facts about sea urchins, including what they eat and what they do.

What They Eat

  • Sea urchins have sharp teeth, so they can eat just about anything.
  • Their favorite thing to eat is algae because they can use their sharp teeth to scrape it off for food.
  • They eat lots of other things such as mussels, periwinkle and kelp.
  • Fish is also a popular thing for sea urchins to eat.

What They Do

  • They help our environment by eating dead organisms.
  • Sea urchins stay on the coral reef.
  • They are sensitive to light, which is why they stay at the bottom of the ocean and don’t move that much.
  • They will protect themselves if something tries to poke them. Their spiky needles will go in that direction, so don’t get too close to one!

There are other interesting facts about the sea urchin. For example, they are very small. An adult can be as big as 4.7 in. They are located all over the world, and there are lots of them. Another interesting fact is that they are considered the ocean’s oldest animals.

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19 COMMENTS

  1. Poor report!
    They don’t “look like” something because of what they”do”
    Your question “Do sea urchins have eyes?” Is never answered.
    Is the picture his bottom or his top?
    Try again please.

  2. I was able to quickly Google this to help you out 🙂
    Sea urchins, like their close relatives the sea stars (starfish), don’t technically have eyes. Instead, the ball-like invertebrates detect light striking their spines and compare the beams intensities to get a sense of their surroundings.

  3. The Japanese harvest them for their eggs or Roe ; called as it’s pronounced: Ooo-nee. Succulent and delicious as a sushi compliment. Far more costly than salmon roe. Please try it at your finer Japanese establishment.

  4. Available at your sushi bar. At one time, they were plentiful at any tide pool for the picking. Like everything else, not so much anymore.

  5. Hi there great blog! Does running a blog like this require a lot of work? I’ve virtually no knowledge of computer programming but I was hoping to start my own blog in the near future. Anyway, if you have any ideas or tips for new blog owners please share. I understand this is off topic but I just had to ask. Kudos!

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